Tag Archives: hotel

A Kiwi Connection to the Oberoi Grand

Due to the length of our trip we are, by necessity, budget travelers. We arrange for periodic episodes of luxury from time to time to keep our spirits up, and to see how the other half lives in some of the places we’re visiting. We tend to do this when the opportunity presents itself or when we really need a break. Our friend Jackie recently provided such an opportunity. She is an executive at a company called ‘Kiwi Connection’ that provides a luxury hotel booking service. She is in no way from New Zealand, but she was our Kiwi connection to the Oberoi Grand, the finest hotel in Kolkatta.

We arrived by taxi from our 1-star guest house to this 5-star palace. It is an oasis in the middle of Calcutta, tucked away behind busy streets lined with hawkers and crowded with people.

We wrote about our experience for Kiwi Connection’s travel blog JetSetter. See the article we submitted below. Thanks Jackie!

A Kiwi Connection to the Oberoi Grand

I recently had the pleasure of staying at The Oberoi Grand in Kolkata, India. Kolkata, often referred to by its previous name Calcutta, is the capital of West Bengal state and was the original home of the British colonial government in India. Although it’s a large and vibrant city, it also has a rich culture and history. The Oberoi Grand is one of the landmark hotels of Oberoi Hotels and Resorts, which has nineteen luxury properties across South Asia, the majority being in India, Egypt, and Indonesia. India has a reputation among some groups as an exotic travel destination but Oberoi offers luxury hotels and resorts throughout the country.

The Oberoi Grand is quite literally a breath of fresh air, accompanied by a hint of fragrance from the huge bouquet of fresh flowers in the lobby. The hotel is a haven in the middle of the city. Just stepping into the building provides one with a palpable sense of calm and tranquility.

My wife and I arrived by taxi and experienced a seamless transition from the entrance to the lobby to our guest room. In the process we received a traditional Indian greeting from no less than ten attentive staff. The Oberoi Grand takes the security of its guests seriously, discretely checking cars, people, and bags as they enter the hotel. Hotel staff instantly recognized our reservation through Kiwi Connection, and we received a complementary upgrade to a luxury room with high ceilings and a view over the central courtyard. Our room was elegantly furnished including a four post bed and large flat screen television, with fresh fruit and flowers.

The Oberoi Grand is conveniently located, close to the main business and shopping districts of Kolkata — Park Street, BBD Bagh, and Chowringhee. The hotel is over 125 years old with Victorian columned architecture. It is in impeccable condition, with interiors and rooms stylishly appointed and spotlessly clean. The hotel has a lounge, two restaurants, and an outstanding buffet breakfast was complementary. Our Indian dinner at the restaurant was one of the best we’ve had in India. The Oberoi Grand has a luxurious spa, modern fitness facility with terrific equipment, and a relaxing courtyard with pool. Wireless Internet access is available throughout the hotel.

Soon after we arrived at the The Oberoi Grand, senior staff introduced themselves, and then addressed us by name for the remainder of our visit. They inquired frequently and sincerely if we were enjoying ourselves and if there was anything else we required. They discreetly asked about our plans, without being intrusive, so as to better assist us. They politely and efficiently handled the special requests that we made, like scheduling an appointment at a recommended hairdresser for my wife. We visited Kolkata during the final days of a large and spectacular Indian festival, Durga Puja, and the staff were pleased to provide us with information about the festival and how best to participate.

The Oberoi Grand provided everything we expect of a luxury hotel, plus a little more. We would recommend it for any business or leisure traveler seeking an exceptional stay in the heart of Kolkata.

One Night in Cairo

We arrived at Cairo airport from London at about midnight. We cleared immigration on the 2nd try, after we went were sent back to buy a Visa stamp. Fortunately, it was $15US each, rather than the $25 we expected. Upon exit from the arrival terminal, we were fully expecting to be swarmed by airport “touts”, and had spent time on the plane discussing our strategy. The best approach seemed to be to push through the wall of men offering help with a taxi or hotel, and negotiate closer to the street. The guide book said 35 Egyptian pounds (E£35) was a good negotiated rate for a taxi to the airport, but this may have been only from the city to the airport. After negotiating with several guys, an impromptu auction arose, with Patrick talking to a group of men all at once. Eventually Patrick got a guy to agree to E£45.

He walked us away from the airport and down a long tunnel, which was a bit worrisome. We got to his small car, and Patrick got his first request for baksheesh (alms or a tip) from a nearby taxi driver, which was declined, because this other fella hadn’t done anything for us. Diane rode with our packs in the back seat. Why? Because it is easier to exit the cab for the agreed upon fare if you bags aren’t held hostage in the locked trunk. The car didn’t move for about 3 minutes, which seemed like an eternity, but I think it was because it may have been prayer time, as a chant came across the car radio.

Exiting the airport, the driver wanted Patrick to pay the E£5 airport fee, and he wouldn’t until the driver agreed that his remaining fee would now only be E£40. A bit of shouting ensued, but he was under pressure because we were blocking the toll booth. He reluctantly agreed, but it didn’t seem like he was committed to it, or very happy about it. He drove us to town, but didn’t know where the hotel was. After talking to a number of cab drivers (some while both cab were in motion) and a couple of street police offers, we made it to a huge locked gate on a very dark and dusty street with a painted sign that said “African Hotel” illuminated by a single incandescent bulb. Diane stayed in the car, which we couldn’t afford to lose until we confirmed that we could get in, while Patrick checked the gate. There was an old man on a cot inside the gate, who rose slowly, almost painfully, to unlock the chain that held the very old heavy cast iron gates closed.

We walked down a large hallway into what was once a grand old colonial building, with sparse lighting illuminating pealing paint. We climbed 3 flights of wide stone stairs, following small signs that said “Africa”. On the 3rd floor, we found a small, dimly lit room with a desk, and a helpful young Egyptian. He had our name already written in a book, from our online reservation done in London the night before, the technological advancement of which was in stark contrast to the environment we now found ourselves in.

We were shown to a huge room, with 15 foot ceilings, high door ways, and 3 beds. You could tell this was once a beautiful old building. It still was, if you could see through the dirt and the many layers of cracking paint. The old floorboards flexed so much when Diane walked on them, she was worried she might fall through. The sheets seemed cleaned based on the sniff test, and we locked ourselves into the room using an old-fashioned key from the inside of the room.

At this point, Diane was stressed almost to her limit, and it took some time for her calm down. Patrick laid out our sleeping sheets (individual sleeping bag liners made of silk), into which we put our money belts and ourselves for safekeeping. Diane clung to Patrick as loud noises outside made sleep difficult.

We wrote this the following morning, so we obviously survived our first night in Cairo. It was an exhilarating introduction to one of the world’s great cities.