Tag Archives: interior

Introducing our new motorhome

We purchased a new 2013 Forest River Solera 24S. You can read about our search here The Search for our RV (Part 1) and The Search for our RV (Part 2).  We purchased the Special Edition model which supposedly has a number of upgrades, but I believe that every Solera available is an SE, making it more of a mandatory or ‘feel good’ upgrade package than a true option.

Passenger side of white motorhome on flast desert ground taken from low angle

Our Solera is 7.5 meters (24.5 feet) long, but almost a meter longer (i.e. 27 feet) with the rear bike rack we added (more about that to come).  It is 2.3 meters (7 feet 7 inches) wide and 3.5 meters (11 feet 6 inches) high, which Martin will be pleased to hear allows an interior height of 2.13 meters (7 feet).

It sits on a Mercedes Benz Sprinter 3500 chassis made in Germany.  It has a Mercedes Benz V6 3.0 Litre BlueTec Turbo diesel engine capable of 188 horsepower and a 5-speed automatic transmission with overdrive and tip-shift (which allows optional manual shifting).  The rear axle has 4 wheels for a total of 6.

It has a 26.4 gallon (100 Litre) fuel tank and should get 12-17 miles per gallon (15.6 L/100km), for an estimated range of 400 miles (630 kilometers).

Motorhome taken from front at 3/4 angle in a parking lot at night

Solera Exterior at night

Our Solera has the standard exterior (white gel-coat fiberglass with stickers) which was cheaper than the full-body paint and should be cooler in the summer.  It has a fiberglass roof (more durable and easier to maintain) and a 1-piece fiberglass nose cap (fewer leaks).

It has 1.9 cubic meters (67 cubic feet) of external storage across 5 compartments including a large ‘garage’ at the rear.  It also has a 4.6 meter (15 feet) long electric awning that extends and retracts at the touch of a button.

The cab from the rear with 2 seats, dash, steering wheel, and multi-media system

The Cab

The cab has an open feel and plenty of leg room because it doesn’t have a large center console (unlike the Ford chassis), but there is still plenty of storage in the dash, doors, and above the visors.

The cab multi-media system is feature rich (7” touchscreen with AM/FM, CD, DVD, USB, Aux, weather band, Bluetooth, an iPod dock, and GPS) but it’s quality-challenged.  There is also a back up camera where the rear view mirror would normally be.

Kitchen on the left, bed and bathroom in the rear, storage and dinette on the right

The interior looking back from the cab

The interior has a kitchen, bed, bathroom, vanity, dinette, and storage plus an additional bed (or more storage) over the cab.  The woodwork is cherry and the fabrics are what Forest River calls ‘fieldstone’.

Our Solera has a 2.75 meter (9 foot) long slide on the driver’s side that can extend the dinette, closet, and drawers outward to create more living space.  Everything in the RV is operational and there is sufficient room for 2 people to function when the slide is in, but having it extended makes a big difference.  Diane has said several times how happy she is that we got a motorhome with a slide.

The kitchen with cupboards, cook top, oven, microwave, and fridge.

The Kitchen

The kitchen has a single sink, a 3 burner gas cooktop, a gas oven, a range hood with an exhaust fan and a dim light, a microwave, and a refrigerator with separate freezer.  The fridge will run on propane or 110 V electricity.

The bed with a comforter with windows on 2 sides

The Bed

We have a rear corner bed which at 50 x 75 inches (1.25 x 1.9 meters) is 10” narrower and 5” shorter than a standard queen-sized bed.  Yes Martin, there is room to sleep diagonally or dangle one’s feet off the end of the bed.  Because the bed is in a corner, it’s a bit awkward to make and to get out of at night, but it’s very comfortable after we added a memory foam mattress topper.  Diane is very happy in the bed department.

Bathroom with open door showing shower and toilet.  Vanity outside.

The bathroom and Vanity

The bathroom has a shower with a glass sliding door and a skylight above.  There is a porcelain commode that flushes with a foot pedal, but very little leg room when one is sitting on it.  We haven’t figured out where to attach the toilet paper holder yet!  There is also a vanity with a small sink, medicine cabinet, and mirror just outside the bathroom.

Closet, panty, and drawers in cheery wood besider a 4 person dinette

Storage and Dinette

Beside the closet, pull out panty, and storage drawers is the dinette which seats 4 people.  There are seatbelts in the dinette for 2 people (not for eating and drinking but for driving!).  From the dinette we can also watch the flat screen, 12 Volt TV that swings out from over the cab.  We can plug in to cable TV when available, receive ‘over the air’ high-definition television broadcasts with the adjustable roof antenna, watch video from our laptop, or play DVDs from the cab multi-media system.

We’re very happy with the layout and features of our new motorhome.  As we expected in a new RV, we’re finding a few glitches, but we hope to have them worked out soon.  Perhaps all that research was worth it!

Down to our Last Złoty

Many countries in Europe are part of the Eurozone, a monetary union of 17 European Union (EU) member states (a subset of the total number of 27) that have adopted the Euro as their sole legal currency.  Some members of the EU are not members of the Eurozone, including several that we’ll be traveling to.  This requires us to purchase or convert to a new currency in each country, with the associated effort of buying or converting upon arrival and spending or converting upon departure.  This was a constant headache when traveling in Africa, where currency exchange often had to be done in an open air, risk laden free-for-all in the ‘no man’s land’ between border crossings.  It less hassle but still an inconvenience when traveling through non-Eurozone countries.  To make things simpler, we often try to spend all of our remaining currency before leaving a country if we won’t be returning or needing that currency at a later date.

This is exactly what we tried to do in the south of Poland, before crossing into Slovakia.  Poland’s currency is the złoty.  In Polish, it literally means ‘golden’.  We needed some groceries and we had exactly 38 złoty and 75 grosze to our collective names.  Each grosze is 1/100th of a złoty (like pennies to a dollar or pence to a pound).  This converts to $12.02 Canadian at current rates. Not a lot for grocery shopping, but enough to pick up some needed items.

We headed in to a Carrefour Market with our iPhone calculator in hand and with the objective of buying groceries adding up to but not exceeding our remaining złoty.  It’s kind of like the final showcase of the long-running game show The Price is Right.  To win you need to get as close as possible without going over your remaining cash.  Note that this shopping game is much easier to play in Europe because there is no added sales tax.

Diane started picking out things and I dutifully added the value of each to our running total.  Shopping in Poland is not without its challenges due to the fact there is no English, French, nor typically even German on the packaging.  Sometimes it’s a bit of a guessing game.  When in doubt we try to ask for help, but of course the staff don’t usually speak any English either.  We were trying to buy some peirogis (the Polish spelling of what we normally spell as ‘perogy’).  Diane wanted the ones with potato filling, but in Poland they are often filled with cabbage or mushrooms or meat, so she wanted to be sure.  She asked the young lady who was serving them, but despite their best efforts to communicate, nothing was getting through.  I offered the word “kartoffel” which is German for potato, in hopes that she might speak some German or that the word might be similar in Polish.  No luck.  Apparently potato is ‘ziemniak’ in Polish.

Diane went to the produce section and returned with a potato, pointed at the peirogis and then pointed at the potato in her hand.  The young woman shook her head, implying that none of them involved potatoes.  She went away for a while and in a short time returned with another young woman who spoke a tiny bit of English.  We said that we wanted potato peirogis and she spoke to the other woman in Polish.  By now there were also 2 other staff looking on to our spectacle.  The other woman answered her in Polish and pointed.  It turns out that potato peirogis here are called ‘Rosyjski’ peirogis (pronounced ‘ros-yis-kee’) meaning ‘Russian’.  Problem solved.

Things got added and removed from the cart as we tried to get the most important things we needed with the right combined price.  In the end, I lost track of the total, but I knew we were in the ballpark.  Diane had two cans of tuna that were optional, so we went to the till with the intention of watching the display as the other items were totaled, and then adding the cans of tuna fish one by one if required to get closer to our total budget.  If we were over, I was prepared to sacrifice the bananas.

And so, after all of this, here is the result.  This is what $12.02 CAD worth of złotys will buy you in southern Poland.

The food we purchased displayed on the table of our motorhome

What you can buy for 38.75 złoty

  • 2 small loaves of bread
  • 0.5 kg (1 lb.) of Gouda cheese
  • 0.5 (1 lb.) of cured, salty ham
  • Approximately 30 Russian perogies
  • 1 Litre of Coke Light
  • 2 bananas
  • 4 tomatoes
  • 8 rolls of toilet paper, and
  • 1 can of tuna fish (for good measure)

We think that this is significantly more than $12 would buy in Canada.

We had 1 złoty ‘and change’ left over (a strange expression given that the złoty, like the Canadian Loonie, is itself a coin).  We deposited our final złoty and groszy in the donation box by the door of one of the Wooden Churches of Southern Lesser Poland.

Church with tower all made of wood

A Wooden Church of Southern Lesser Poland

The interior was amazing.

Photo taken from rear balcony of a church with a carved wood interior that is hand painted

The ornate carved wood interior is hand painted

We headed to Slovakia ‘złoty-less’.